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#TechNews: At a media interaction in Delhi on Wednesday , Sundar Pichai explained Google's plan to roll out free wif-fi service on train stations--a promise it made to Prime Minister Narendra Modi when he visited the company's Mountain View headquarters in California in September. Starting with Mumbai Central station in January next year, the company will partner with RailTel to offer high speed free wi-fi service at 100 railway stations in India. The stations will be chosen such that every railway zone is covered. The access for the first hour will be high-speed (HD video quality download in real time), and will slow down afterwards. #Business #Technology #Innovations #Google

#TechNews: At a media interaction in Delhi on Wednesday , Sundar Pichai explained Google's plan to roll out free wif-fi service on train stations--a promise it made to Prime Minister Narendra Modi when he visited the company's Mountain View headquarters in California in September. Starting with Mumbai Central station in January next year, the company will partner with RailTel to offer high speed free wi-fi service at 100 railway stations in India. The stations will be chosen such that every railway zone is covered. The access for the first hour will be high-speed (HD video quality download in real time), and will slow down afterwards. #Business #Technology #Innovations #Google

#TechNews: At a media interaction in Delhi on Wednesday , Sundar Pichai explained Google's plan to roll out free wif-fi service on train stations--a promise it made to Prime Minister Narendra Modi when he visited the company's Mountain View headquarters in California in September. Starting with Mumbai Central station in January next year, the company will partner with RailTel to offer high speed free wi-fi service at 100 railway stations in India. The stations will be chosen such that every railway zone is covered. The access for the first hour will be high-speed (HD video quality download in real time), and will slow down afterwards. #Business #Technology #Innovations #Google

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#TechNews Apple has partnered with Visa, MasterCard and American Express to create a mobile payment platform, allowing users to pay with their iPhones in brick and mortar stores.

#TechNews Apple has partnered with Visa, MasterCard and American Express to create a mobile payment platform, allowing users to pay with their iPhones in brick and mortar stores.

#TechNews Apple has partnered with Visa, MasterCard and American Express to create a mobile payment platform, allowing users to pay with their iPhones in brick and mortar stores.

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A More Efficient Jet Engine Is Made from Lighter Parts, Some 3-D Printed A new generation of engines being developed by the world’s largest jet engine maker, CFM (a partnership between GE and Snecma of France), will allow aircraft to use about 15 percent less fuel—enough to save about $1 million per year per airplane and significantly reduce carbon emissions.

A More Efficient Jet Engine Is Made from Lighter Parts, Some 3-D Printed A new generation of engines being developed by the world’s largest jet engine maker, CFM (a partnership between GE and Snecma of France), will allow aircraft to use about 15 percent less fuel—enough to save about $1 million per year per airplane and significantly reduce carbon emissions.

A More Efficient Jet Engine Is Made from Lighter Parts, Some 3-D Printed A new generation of engines being developed by the world’s largest jet engine maker, CFM (a partnership between GE and Snecma of France), will allow aircraft to use about 15 percent less fuel—enough to save about $1 million per year per airplane and significantly reduce carbon emissions.

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What is Google Glass & How it works..? Google Glass is a wearable computer with a head-mounted display, with the mission of producing a mass-market ubiquitous computer. Google Glass displays information in a smartphone-like hands-free format, that can interact with the Internet via natural language voice commands. Well, artist Martin Missfeldt created an infographic that explains the wonders of technology behind Google's technologically-enhanced glasses. At the heart of the tech that makes Google Glass tick are a mini projector and a semi-transparent prism which project an augmented reality layer of information directly to the user's retina. We don't have a lot of the final details on specs just yet - but it is expected Google Glass to run modified Android. Google is considering partnering with sunglass retailers such as Ray-Ban or Warby Parker, and may also open retail stores to allow customers to try on the device. The Explorer Edition cannot be used by people who wear prescription glasses, but Google has confirmed that Glass will eventually work with frames and lenses.

What is Google Glass & How it works..? Google Glass is a wearable computer with a head-mounted display, with the mission of producing a mass-market ubiquitous computer. Google Glass displays information in a smartphone-like hands-free format, that can interact with the Internet via natural language voice commands. Well, artist Martin Missfeldt created an infographic that explains the wonders of technology behind Google's technologically-enhanced glasses. At the heart of the tech that makes Google Glass tick are a mini projector and a semi-transparent prism which project an augmented reality layer of information directly to the user's retina. We don't have a lot of the final details on specs just yet - but it is expected Google Glass to run modified Android. Google is considering partnering with sunglass retailers such as Ray-Ban or Warby Parker, and may also open retail stores to allow customers to try on the device. The Explorer Edition cannot be used by people who wear prescription glasses, but Google has confirmed that Glass will eventually work with frames and lenses.

What is Google Glass & How it works..? Google Glass is a wearable computer with a head-mounted display, with the mission of producing a mass-market ubiquitous computer. Google Glass displays information in a smartphone-like hands-free format, that can interact with the Internet via natural language voice commands. Well, artist Martin Missfeldt created an infographic that explains the wonders of technology behind Google's technologically-enhanced glasses. At the heart of the tech that makes Google Glass tick are a mini projector and a semi-transparent prism which project an augmented reality layer of information directly to the user's retina. We don't have a lot of the final details on specs just yet - but it is expected Google Glass to run modified Android. Google is considering partnering with sunglass retailers such as Ray-Ban or Warby Parker, and may also open retail stores to allow customers to try on the device. The Explorer Edition cannot be used by people who wear prescription glasses, but Google has confirmed that Glass will eventually work with frames and lenses.

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:: Cel-Factor technology claims to protect humans from EMF radiation :: At the CTIA Wireless event last week, bio-resonance technology company von Hoffmann & Partner Technologies together with CeL-Factor introduced its new line of EMF radiation protection devices. The CeL-Factor technology uses its own Energetic Quanta Cymatics Communication Technology (EQCCT) to protect wireless device users from absorbing the effects of EMF radiation. The company claims that its technology will help mobile users in two ways: keep a person’s head temperature cooler when using a cell phone, and keep a cell phone user’s blood in a normal state (note that this has not been proven yet). von Hoffmann and Partner Technologies reportedly participated in a comprehensive study conducted at the world renowned Jasper Clinical Research and Development to determine its effectiveness in diminishing the harmful effects of EMF radiation. So how does it work? Let’s take a closer look. According to the company, its CeL-Factor device will not affect the performance of mobile phones or other devices. CeL-Factor does not shield or block the EMF radiation from the cell phone or other wireless devices. If it did, the wireless device would not function as designed,” the company said. CeL-Factor claims to work in the body of a wearer by communicating on a cellular level to keep cells organized when distortion occurs from EMF emitting devices such as cell phones and other wireless devices. Although the World Health Organization considers the heavy usage of cell phones as carcinogenic, that will not exclude us from adding a grain of salt to the said CeL-Factor technology.

:: Cel-Factor technology claims to protect humans from EMF radiation :: At the CTIA Wireless event last week, bio-resonance technology company von Hoffmann & Partner Technologies together with CeL-Factor introduced its new line of EMF radiation protection devices. The CeL-Factor technology uses its own Energetic Quanta Cymatics Communication Technology (EQCCT) to protect wireless device users from absorbing the effects of EMF radiation. The company claims that its technology will help mobile users in two ways: keep a person’s head temperature cooler when using a cell phone, and keep a cell phone user’s blood in a normal state (note that this has not been proven yet). von Hoffmann and Partner Technologies reportedly participated in a comprehensive study conducted at the world renowned Jasper Clinical Research and Development to determine its effectiveness in diminishing the harmful effects of EMF radiation. So how does it work? Let’s take a closer look. According to the company, its CeL-Factor device will not affect the performance of mobile phones or other devices. CeL-Factor does not shield or block the EMF radiation from the cell phone or other wireless devices. If it did, the wireless device would not function as designed,” the company said. CeL-Factor claims to work in the body of a wearer by communicating on a cellular level to keep cells organized when distortion occurs from EMF emitting devices such as cell phones and other wireless devices. Although the World Health Organization considers the heavy usage of cell phones as carcinogenic, that will not exclude us from adding a grain of salt to the said CeL-Factor technology.

:: Cel-Factor technology claims to protect humans from EMF radiation :: At the CTIA Wireless event last week, bio-resonance technology company von Hoffmann & Partner Technologies together with CeL-Factor introduced its new line of EMF radiation protection devices. The CeL-Factor technology uses its own Energetic Quanta Cymatics Communication Technology (EQCCT) to protect wireless device users from absorbing the effects of EMF radiation. The company claims that its technology will help mobile users in two ways: keep a person’s head temperature cooler when using a cell phone, and keep a cell phone user’s blood in a normal state (note that this has not been proven yet). von Hoffmann and Partner Technologies reportedly participated in a comprehensive study conducted at the world renowned Jasper Clinical Research and Development to determine its effectiveness in diminishing the harmful effects of EMF radiation. So how does it work? Let’s take a closer look. According to the company, its CeL-Factor device will not affect the performance of mobile phones or other devices. CeL-Factor does not shield or block the EMF radiation from the cell phone or other wireless devices. If it did, the wireless device would not function as designed,” the company said. CeL-Factor claims to work in the body of a wearer by communicating on a cellular level to keep cells organized when distortion occurs from EMF emitting devices such as cell phones and other wireless devices. Although the World Health Organization considers the heavy usage of cell phones as carcinogenic, that will not exclude us from adding a grain of salt to the said CeL-Factor technology.

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:: How Google's Drive helps kill Microsoft's Office :: This is how a search company can steal the productivity business: By storing work, not helping users edit it. Google's hard drive in the sky, Google Drive, is a big threat to other cloud storage products like Dropbox and Box. But it's also a stab straight at the heart of Microsoft's mainstream business software, Microsoft Office. While Google's productivity application suites, Docs (now incorporated into Drive) and Apps (for businesses), have been making some headway into Microsoft Office's territory, the important battlefield is not the application. It's the data. If Google can move the battlefield to a place where it has the bigger army and better weapons, the whole game changes. Google Drive might make that happen. Let's look at the world from behind Google-colored glasses. Every time a user performs a search in the Google search engine, or clicks a link in Chrome, or +1s an item in Plus, Google adds an atom of data to its knowledge of what people like and what they do. This information helps Google index the Web and rank its results when people are searching for something. This is also the Facebook model, by the way. Moreover, every action that generates user data that doesn't touch down in a Google product or service deprives Google of information that it could otherwise use to index and understand the Web of human knowledge and preference. Microsoft Word documents stored on PCs? In the most uncharitable view, every one is money being stolen from Google. All closed, siloed apps, for that matter, remove opportunity from Google. Co-founder Sergey Brin has recently spoken out against apps and companies that wall off data from the open Internet. There is indeed a danger, but it's not just about openness, it's about Google's own ability to index the data. Back to Google Drive: By acting as the substrate for user data -- in other words, the file system -- Google gets exposed to many times more information. Google doesn't need, and in fact has no reason, to make this data public, but having it available to index and cross-reference does make the company's core service, targeted advertising, more valuable. The more data Google has, the more valuable its product becomes. And that product, in case it's not already clear, is you. Your attention, which is sold to advertisers. Microsoft's main product, meanwhile, is software, not data. (And its customers aren't advertisers, but people who buy software.) So why can't Microsoft's model and Google's live in harmony? Because Microsoft's software suite consists of application software and an operating system, and the operating system stores user data, and the data is what Google wants. So Google is undermining that function with Google Drive, and not just by offering a synchronized file system (which, by the way, Microsoft also offers). Once users put their data in Google Drive, they will also find out how easy it is to open these files in non-Microsoft apps. This is one of the reasons Google is launching Google Drive with an API for developers and a suite of partner products that shave off Microsoft customers a bit at a time. One of the most important features that third-party developers are using with Google Drive is the "Open with" feature. If you upload a Microsoft Project file to Drive, for example, you can open it with the Web app SmartSheet, directly on the Web. Similarly, Web apps like SlideRocket can open PowerPoint files. Google's own productivity apps can also open Microsoft files. The more people realize that they don't need Office to access their archives of files from the pre-Google Drive era, the more likely they are to look to Google Drive (or perhaps competing products, if they have similar partners) as primary storage. And Google wins, while Microsoft loses. How can Microsoft counter this market erosion at Google's hands? The company has its own cloud storage product and a strong history with developers. And it has the business customers. But according to a Google Drive developer I spoke with, one who's been dealing also with Microsoft for years, Microsoft is not there yet. It has the centralized storage in SkyDrive and Office 365, but not the infrastructure -- especially the identity and sign-on tools -- that developers need to integrate into the Microsoft cloud. Microsoft also needs to protect its software licensing revenue for Office. Google, the upstart in business software, can undercut Microsoft's prices since all its software sales are incremental on top of its search and advertising businesses. Other companies realize that whoever controls the data controls the market. Box, for instance, just launched OneCloud, which lets you open documents in a variety of apps. It's mobile-only so far, though. It is no longer a PC world, and because of that Microsoft doesn't own the world of work. People do their jobs on their own computers, on the Web, and on mobile devices; and they expect their work to follow them onto whatever hardware they're using. Every major technology company understands this. But only a few have the products, the infrastructure, and the freedom to get ahead of the shift.

:: How Google's Drive helps kill Microsoft's Office :: This is how a search company can steal the productivity business: By storing work, not helping users edit it. Google's hard drive in the sky, Google Drive, is a big threat to other cloud storage products like Dropbox and Box. But it's also a stab straight at the heart of Microsoft's mainstream business software, Microsoft Office. While Google's productivity application suites, Docs (now incorporated into Drive) and Apps (for businesses), have been making some headway into Microsoft Office's territory, the important battlefield is not the application. It's the data. If Google can move the battlefield to a place where it has the bigger army and better weapons, the whole game changes. Google Drive might make that happen. Let's look at the world from behind Google-colored glasses. Every time a user performs a search in the Google search engine, or clicks a link in Chrome, or +1s an item in Plus, Google adds an atom of data to its knowledge of what people like and what they do. This information helps Google index the Web and rank its results when people are searching for something. This is also the Facebook model, by the way. Moreover, every action that generates user data that doesn't touch down in a Google product or service deprives Google of information that it could otherwise use to index and understand the Web of human knowledge and preference. Microsoft Word documents stored on PCs? In the most uncharitable view, every one is money being stolen from Google. All closed, siloed apps, for that matter, remove opportunity from Google. Co-founder Sergey Brin has recently spoken out against apps and companies that wall off data from the open Internet. There is indeed a danger, but it's not just about openness, it's about Google's own ability to index the data. Back to Google Drive: By acting as the substrate for user data -- in other words, the file system -- Google gets exposed to many times more information. Google doesn't need, and in fact has no reason, to make this data public, but having it available to index and cross-reference does make the company's core service, targeted advertising, more valuable. The more data Google has, the more valuable its product becomes. And that product, in case it's not already clear, is you. Your attention, which is sold to advertisers. Microsoft's main product, meanwhile, is software, not data. (And its customers aren't advertisers, but people who buy software.) So why can't Microsoft's model and Google's live in harmony? Because Microsoft's software suite consists of application software and an operating system, and the operating system stores user data, and the data is what Google wants. So Google is undermining that function with Google Drive, and not just by offering a synchronized file system (which, by the way, Microsoft also offers). Once users put their data in Google Drive, they will also find out how easy it is to open these files in non-Microsoft apps. This is one of the reasons Google is launching Google Drive with an API for developers and a suite of partner products that shave off Microsoft customers a bit at a time. One of the most important features that third-party developers are using with Google Drive is the "Open with" feature. If you upload a Microsoft Project file to Drive, for example, you can open it with the Web app SmartSheet, directly on the Web. Similarly, Web apps like SlideRocket can open PowerPoint files. Google's own productivity apps can also open Microsoft files. The more people realize that they don't need Office to access their archives of files from the pre-Google Drive era, the more likely they are to look to Google Drive (or perhaps competing products, if they have similar partners) as primary storage. And Google wins, while Microsoft loses. How can Microsoft counter this market erosion at Google's hands? The company has its own cloud storage product and a strong history with developers. And it has the business customers. But according to a Google Drive developer I spoke with, one who's been dealing also with Microsoft for years, Microsoft is not there yet. It has the centralized storage in SkyDrive and Office 365, but not the infrastructure -- especially the identity and sign-on tools -- that developers need to integrate into the Microsoft cloud. Microsoft also needs to protect its software licensing revenue for Office. Google, the upstart in business software, can undercut Microsoft's prices since all its software sales are incremental on top of its search and advertising businesses. Other companies realize that whoever controls the data controls the market. Box, for instance, just launched OneCloud, which lets you open documents in a variety of apps. It's mobile-only so far, though. It is no longer a PC world, and because of that Microsoft doesn't own the world of work. People do their jobs on their own computers, on the Web, and on mobile devices; and they expect their work to follow them onto whatever hardware they're using. Every major technology company understands this. But only a few have the products, the infrastructure, and the freedom to get ahead of the shift.

:: How Google's Drive helps kill Microsoft's Office :: This is how a search company can steal the productivity business: By storing work, not helping users edit it. Google's hard drive in the sky, Google Drive, is a big threat to other cloud storage products like Dropbox and Box. But it's also a stab straight at the heart of Microsoft's mainstream business software, Microsoft Office. While Google's productivity application suites, Docs (now incorporated into Drive) and Apps (for businesses), have been making some headway into Microsoft Office's territory, the important battlefield is not the application. It's the data. If Google can move the battlefield to a place where it has the bigger army and better weapons, the whole game changes. Google Drive might make that happen. Let's look at the world from behind Google-colored glasses. Every time a user performs a search in the Google search engine, or clicks a link in Chrome, or +1s an item in Plus, Google adds an atom of data to its knowledge of what people like and what they do. This information helps Google index the Web and rank its results when people are searching for something. This is also the Facebook model, by the way. Moreover, every action that generates user data that doesn't touch down in a Google product or service deprives Google of information that it could otherwise use to index and understand the Web of human knowledge and preference. Microsoft Word documents stored on PCs? In the most uncharitable view, every one is money being stolen from Google. All closed, siloed apps, for that matter, remove opportunity from Google. Co-founder Sergey Brin has recently spoken out against apps and companies that wall off data from the open Internet. There is indeed a danger, but it's not just about openness, it's about Google's own ability to index the data. Back to Google Drive: By acting as the substrate for user data -- in other words, the file system -- Google gets exposed to many times more information. Google doesn't need, and in fact has no reason, to make this data public, but having it available to index and cross-reference does make the company's core service, targeted advertising, more valuable. The more data Google has, the more valuable its product becomes. And that product, in case it's not already clear, is you. Your attention, which is sold to advertisers. Microsoft's main product, meanwhile, is software, not data. (And its customers aren't advertisers, but people who buy software.) So why can't Microsoft's model and Google's live in harmony? Because Microsoft's software suite consists of application software and an operating system, and the operating system stores user data, and the data is what Google wants. So Google is undermining that function with Google Drive, and not just by offering a synchronized file system (which, by the way, Microsoft also offers). Once users put their data in Google Drive, they will also find out how easy it is to open these files in non-Microsoft apps. This is one of the reasons Google is launching Google Drive with an API for developers and a suite of partner products that shave off Microsoft customers a bit at a time. One of the most important features that third-party developers are using with Google Drive is the "Open with" feature. If you upload a Microsoft Project file to Drive, for example, you can open it with the Web app SmartSheet, directly on the Web. Similarly, Web apps like SlideRocket can open PowerPoint files. Google's own productivity apps can also open Microsoft files. The more people realize that they don't need Office to access their archives of files from the pre-Google Drive era, the more likely they are to look to Google Drive (or perhaps competing products, if they have similar partners) as primary storage. And Google wins, while Microsoft loses. How can Microsoft counter this market erosion at Google's hands? The company has its own cloud storage product and a strong history with developers. And it has the business customers. But according to a Google Drive developer I spoke with, one who's been dealing also with Microsoft for years, Microsoft is not there yet. It has the centralized storage in SkyDrive and Office 365, but not the infrastructure -- especially the identity and sign-on tools -- that developers need to integrate into the Microsoft cloud. Microsoft also needs to protect its software licensing revenue for Office. Google, the upstart in business software, can undercut Microsoft's prices since all its software sales are incremental on top of its search and advertising businesses. Other companies realize that whoever controls the data controls the market. Box, for instance, just launched OneCloud, which lets you open documents in a variety of apps. It's mobile-only so far, though. It is no longer a PC world, and because of that Microsoft doesn't own the world of work. People do their jobs on their own computers, on the Web, and on mobile devices; and they expect their work to follow them onto whatever hardware they're using. Every major technology company understands this. But only a few have the products, the infrastructure, and the freedom to get ahead of the shift.

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:: A new initiative to tackle cyber threats launched at WEF :: A new initiative on cyber security has been launched at the World Economic Forum to strengthen efforts to combat rising cyber risks. The initiative 'Partnering for Cyber Resilience' is a set of shared principles, endorsed by chief executives of firms that recognise interdependence of organisations in tackling cyber risks, according to a statement from the WEF. Citing the importance of the initiative, India's largest software exporter TCS CEO and MD N Chandrasekaran underlined the need for consistent processes and uniform policy framework (in the digital world) that can be implemented internationally. The new programme would engage the corporate firms into working towards a safer digital environment. "We need to recognize that making the world more resilient to cyber-risks is a challenge that can only be addressed collectively by policy-makers, business and civil society," Alan Marcus, senior director and head of Information Technology and Telecommunications Industries at WEF USA, said. "Everything attached to a network can be hacked and everything is being attached to a network," Rod A Beckstrom, president and chief executive officer of the Internet Corp of Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), said. US consultancy major Deloitte LLP was project advisor to the programme, developed through multi-stakeholder dialogue across the globe. Source :- ibnlive.com

:: A new initiative to tackle cyber threats launched at WEF :: A new initiative on cyber security has been launched at the World Economic Forum to strengthen efforts to combat rising cyber risks. The initiative 'Partnering for Cyber Resilience' is a set of shared principles, endorsed by chief executives of firms that recognise interdependence of organisations in tackling cyber risks, according to a statement from the WEF. Citing the importance of the initiative, India's largest software exporter TCS CEO and MD N Chandrasekaran underlined the need for consistent processes and uniform policy framework (in the digital world) that can be implemented internationally. The new programme would engage the corporate firms into working towards a safer digital environment. "We need to recognize that making the world more resilient to cyber-risks is a challenge that can only be addressed collectively by policy-makers, business and civil society," Alan Marcus, senior director and head of Information Technology and Telecommunications Industries at WEF USA, said. "Everything attached to a network can be hacked and everything is being attached to a network," Rod A Beckstrom, president and chief executive officer of the Internet Corp of Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), said. US consultancy major Deloitte LLP was project advisor to the programme, developed through multi-stakeholder dialogue across the globe. Source :- ibnlive.com

:: A new initiative to tackle cyber threats launched at WEF :: A new initiative on cyber security has been launched at the World Economic Forum to strengthen efforts to combat rising cyber risks. The initiative 'Partnering for Cyber Resilience' is a set of shared principles, endorsed by chief executives of firms that recognise interdependence of organisations in tackling cyber risks, according to a statement from the WEF. Citing the importance of the initiative, India's largest software exporter TCS CEO and MD N Chandrasekaran underlined the need for consistent processes and uniform policy framework (in the digital world) that can be implemented internationally. The new programme would engage the corporate firms into working towards a safer digital environment. "We need to recognize that making the world more resilient to cyber-risks is a challenge that can only be addressed collectively by policy-makers, business and civil society," Alan Marcus, senior director and head of Information Technology and Telecommunications Industries at WEF USA, said. "Everything attached to a network can be hacked and everything is being attached to a network," Rod A Beckstrom, president and chief executive officer of the Internet Corp of Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), said. US consultancy major Deloitte LLP was project advisor to the programme, developed through multi-stakeholder dialogue across the globe. Source :- ibnlive.com

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:: Crazy Tech Predictions for 2012:: 1. Facebook Buys Digg :- Facebook’s 2012 will look a lot like its 2011: More growth, more change. Still, it hasn’t quite broken through on the content curation and voting side of things. With all the frictionless sharing people will be doing, they may no longer think about accumulating “likes.” Digg started using Facebook’s OpenGraph in 2011, which makes it easy to share what you’re reading on Digg to Facebook. As I see it, this is simply the first step on the road to a much deeper relationship. When Facebook buys Digg next year, users will get the ability to “Digg” not only profile pages, but people. That’s right, you could really “Digg” someone on Facebook. It’s so 1976, but also so cool. 2.Scientists and Hollywood Develop New Way to End Movies :- 3D has pretty much flopped, and it’s getting tougher and tougher to get movie-goers into theaters. Scientists will partner with Hollywood studios to unveil a new technology known as “Fresh Ends.” Using CGI, Hollywood script writers, voice and context recognition and logic algorithms, Fresh Ends technology will generate new endings for some of the world’s most popular films. These slightly rewritten movies will be re-released to theaters — just like the 3D rereleases — and are expected to add 15- to 20% additional box office returns to each film. For now, Fresh Ends only works with movies shot digitally. 3.Apple Intros a 5-inch Tablet Phone Hybrid :- Sorry, no iPhone 5 or iPad 3. Unable to decide whether it should deliver a 7-inch iPad 3 or a 4.5-inch iPhone 5,Apple comes down squarely in the middle with a giant handheld that, naturally, makes calls and is almost large enough to be a usable tablet. The hidden bonus? It’s also a fully functional HDTV. Apple, however, will remain mum for most of the year on whether or not it plans on actually delivering a larger Apple iTV. 4.Google+ Takes Center Stage :- Virtually unchanged for more than a decade, Google’s search page undergoes a subtle, yet important transformation. The search giant places a “+” sign right next to the “Google” Logo. But the change is more than logo-deep. If you hit your own “+” sign on your keyboard before typing in your search query, all results will feature Google+ search results on top. If you hit “+” twice, your search query can be used to launch a new Google+ post. You’ll still have to select which circles you want to share your search query with. Rumors will swirl throughout 2012 that Google wants to rename the entire company “Google+".